The trick to answering the question I posed above is to set specific boundaries when it comes to you and your ex boyfriend. By now you should already realize that being friends with your ex can complicate things when it comes to moving on from him. The trick to complicating things is to define your new relationship with him.

Hi Natasha! You’re awesome! My boyfriend broke up with me, and I’m feeling terrible… my question is, my bf was not a narcissist.. I made mistakes and I started to pushing him because he lived with his mother, he is 39… and I’m 31 and I didn’t felt his priority, we had plans to get married, I’m applying no contact since he broke up with me, I didn’t begged him and I was calm, that was almost a month ago and he hasn’t reach me…. do you think that this works for a man who is not a narcissist? He is not a bad guy.

While each situation might require different solutions, there are some universal truths when it comes to stopping and reversing a breakup. Learning the right (and wrong) things to do and say will help you map out a step-by-step blueprint for getting your exboyfriend back.

Now that you’ve made it a month or 2 without any contact, or at least without initiating contact, and you still know without a doubt he is the one you want to be with, now it is time to take the next step in having your man back in your life.

Look at it like this, every relationship has problems, fights, and disagreements. But if you two broke up, then there was something very wrong with your relationship. You need to analyze what went wrong and realize whether or not it’s a good idea to get back together.

So we only saw each other like 5x since May of this year and he was acting distant once again. Where I would be the one mostly contacting him. Not on a stalker crazy basis but I would find myself complaining to him that why was I the one contacting him and he would make excuses about the 6 months.

This is a very poignant and balanced understanding that you have expressed here. I am 7 months out of 10 year relationship which was both lovely and tumultuous. We were connected on very deep level…a level i never experienced before. We built and created so many things we loved together…things I have a hard time holding close or having as part of me now because they are still too painful or not the same without her. We had a lot of turmoil through our time together driven by each of our own early development damage…and that damage manifested in different ways for each of us. Some times we could hold each other in our damage and what we needed to learn from ourselves and each other, and other times we hurt each other. I think she in many ways loved more fearlessly than I did, but I’m beginning to see how much fear played(s) a role in each of our lives and our life together. She feared not being loved and I feared loving and what I had to lose not gain from really loving and giving love. But I know I learned to love with less fear through being with her…I wasnt always successful but I turned some big corners in what I am able to give and how much I actually embraced loving someone…that it wasnt taking away from me nor a weakness. The worst one can do is to see the time spent with that person as a waste…if we learn it is never a waste…it may hurt like crazy, maybe it will always hurt somehow…but its never a waste if we grow and learn. I know we both learned a lot and there was both pain and beauty in our time together. If there is a next time I know I will love differently and yes I think better…and it will be because of what I learned from 10 years with Melanie…there was a gift in it that I can choose to recognise or not. Only she can decide or see what gift she received. I think for the most part we are both honoring the gifts we gave and received. I know I, at least (although she she says she does too) still grieve immensely our partnership in life…the beautiful things we connected on and built as only the two of us could have built…the dreams we shared together. Those things belong to us and nobody else…they cant be recreated nor should they be…and it hurts terribly at times to have them only as memories. These things, which I mourn the loss of can however play a positive role in how I love in the future, what I embrace and am open to and enthusiastic about giving. I also try to be realistic and not in denial of the turmoil and the things that weren’t great with us…that were outright painful and hurtful…I don’t miss that, and its sometimes easy to forget the struggles and hurt. In the end we were only doing the best we could with who we were at any given time, and shame, blame or regret does not honor the gifts we gave each other…nor does getting stuck in sentimental attachment. Easier said than done?….of course all of this is. But what choice do we have…we either honor the gifts and the lessons and grow or we get stuck and have to learn them all over again. I know what I choose, or at least am trying to choose…even if it hurts and I feel lost and scared. There is no doubt I miss her like I could have never imagined missing anything or anyone….it’s just how it is right now. She was my Otter and there will never be another…she and what we connected on and built cannot be replaced but I am living breathing proof that we can find new lovely things to build and connect on with someone else if we don’t get stuck and choose love over fear.

If you must remain in contact because of children or other shared obligations, know that there is a distinct difference between being friendly and being friends. True friendship means two people care about each other’s well-being and have one another’s best interest at heart. By the time many relationships end, it is often in question whether both parties can genuinely provide this kind of care and support for one another. The expectation that someone who didn’t treat you well while you were together will be capable of being a true friend afterward sets you up to continue being hurt. But choosing to be friendly means you can, without expectations, acknowledge the love you shared and honor that time in your life by treating the other person with kindness and respect.

I have to admit I have been doing all this ever since the last time u email me, not only you but my closest friends told me the same thing and I still didn’t listen until yesterday I had a conversation with two people I trust the most and remember what he said and did and decided that that was it. Sadly I still see him at work but I will listen and follow everyone’s advice. Finally!! ????????

Throw a pillow against the wall. Fill the tub with your favorite bath salts and immerse your body until the water cools down. Stay home and cry it out, but only for a certain amount of time, according to Cosmopolitan’s website. Whether you’ve chosen one day or three, get it out of your system so that, when your time limit is up, you’ll be sick of crying or hearing that song you’ve been playing nonstop.

I broke up with my boyfriend around 1 month ago. We have been in a long distance as we come from different countries, and he’s currently on working holiday. We’ve been together for almost 9 months, including 4 months together in both Taiwan and New Zealand. We are both around 25. He said he doesn’t know what he wants, we’re in a long distance relationship, and even if he comes to Taiwan again, he will keep traveling, he will meet new people, thus he decided to break up with me as he felt he’s not ready for a long-term relationship, even if he cried and it was a hard decision for him as well. He said we could still be good friends even if at that time I didn’t think so.

The most complete people I have ever met were the ones who figured out how to push that uncertainty out of the way and step outside their comfort zone. They gained a lot of interesting experiences and became more complete human beings. I want that for you!

4. Spielmann, S. S., MacDonald, G., & Wilson, A. E. (2009). On the rebound: Focusing on someone new helps anxiously attached individuals let go of ex-partners. Personality and Social Psychological Bulletin, 35, 1382-1394.

Alexandra is a graduate from the University of New Hampshire and the current Assistant Digital Editor at Martha Stewart Living. As a journalism student, she worked as the Director of UNH’s Student Press Organization (SPO) and on staff for four student publications on her campus. In the summer of 2010, she studied abroad at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge University, in England, where she drank afternoon tea and rode the Tube (but sadly no, she did not meet Prince Harry). Since beginning her career, her written work has appeared in USA Today College, Huffington Post, Northshore, and MarthaStewart.com, among others. When not in the office, she can be found perusing travel magazines to plan her next trip, walking her two dogs (both named Rocky), or practicing ballet. Chat with her on Twitter @allie_churchill.

This is a pretty fun topic for me personally because I’m married to my high school ex-boyfriend, and my college ex-boyfriend is my business partner, so I guess you could say I’m a real ex-back success story!

The end of a relationship is always the hardest to get over. Even if you lost interest in your partner and did not feel the love anymore, it may still be hard to move on. They were an integral part of your life. It is definitely hard to see them move on. You cannot just sit there and mope around. It is not a healthy way to live. You are an independent person and do not need to have a partner to make you happy. Here are some tips that might help.

Don’t allow lingering negativity to get in the way when you do meet someone new.[12]Remember that starting a new relationship doesn’t mean it will end like your last one did. Concentrating on how you feel you were wronged will make you appear bitter and unpleasant to be around. If you hold onto these feelings, you could miss the opportunity to meet someone amazing in the future.

If you have difficulty fighting the urge to call him, then try to keep your focus on your goal: Getting your boyfriend back in your arms! Try the psychological exercise that we did before. Like with most things in life, if you keep the end result in mind, it will just be so much easier!

Do this at least for a little while. No, you do not need to be friends. Keeping an ex in your life is not by itself a sign of maturity; knowing how to take care of yourself and your emotional well-being is. Many people hang on to the idea of friendship with an ex as a way to keep the possibility of the relationship alive because the idea of completely letting go seems too overwhelming. While, depending on the circumstances, a friendship may eventually be possible, being friends can’t happen in a genuine way until you have healed through most if not all of the pain, which takes time. Being your own best friend is what is most important during a difficult break-up and that means not putting yourself in situations that don’t lead to feeling good. When you are hurting, you are vulnerable. Protecting yourself with healthy boundaries is an essential part of good self-care. Politely let your ex know you need your space and would prefer not to be in contact for the time being. (Don’t ghost them.)

It can be very difficult to move forward, but as time rolls on, too much motivation and energy will be stuck in the past and will hinder you from achieving the great things that you were made to do. Relationships are a big part of our lives, and something that many people are continuously seeking. But you can’t let them hold you back. Hanging on will only drag on further pain and suffering. Instead, you must look at yourself and say “I am determined to move forward from this”. Sometimes it’s hard to leave the big things in life behind, but you must seek out your bigger and brighter future.

Create boundaries at home and limit the time spent there while she is around. Perhaps go out more, and even if you are at home, sleep in different rooms and engage in as little small talk as possible. You could use this article to provide you with more tips on what you can do while she’s still around. [otp_overlay]